Thursday, March 31, 2011

Japanese Navy Ships Stop At Kochi Before Anti-Piracy Patrol


JDS Sazanami and JDS Inazuma of Japanese Maritime Self Defence Force (JMSDF), called at Kochi for a brief fuelling stopover on their way for anti piracy deployment in the Gulf of Aden. The Ships which are part of Escort Division Eight of JMSDF will be away from their base port of Kure in Hiroshima prefecture for about 5 months. Captain Yoshikiyo Yamamoto, Commander Escort Division Eight is embarked as the Senior Officer on board JDS Sazanami.

The visiting Japanese Navy delegation accompanied by Colonel Nobutaka Mikasa, the Japanese Defence Attache to India, called on Rear Admiral SY Shrikhande, Chief of Staff of Southern Naval Command. Admiral Shrikande conveyed deepest condolences on the loss of life in the recent tragedy in Japan to the visiting Japanese Officers and expressed solidarity with the people of Japan as they brave the aftermath of the disaster. Earlier, a group of Officers from Southern Naval Command visited the Japanese warships. There were also official briefings and professional exchanges on anti piracy operations between the two Navies. Later a lunch was hosted in honour of the visiting Japanese Warships in which Vice Admiral Anurag G Thapliyal, Commandant Indian Naval Academy also attended. The ships will depart Kochi tomorrow morning.


DPR

General Provident Fund Statement 2010-11 Handed Over



In a function held in the DRDO Bhawan today, Shri Arvind Kaushal, Principal Controller of Defence Accounts (Research & Development) handed over to Dr. Vijay Kumar Saraswat, Scientific Advisor to Hon’ble Raksha Mantri, Secreatary, Deptt. Of Defence R&D & Director General, DRDO, his General Provident Fund Statement for the Financial Year 2010-11. The function was attended by Dr. W Selvamurthy, DS & CC R&D (Life Sciences), Sh. G Elangovan, DS & CC R&D (Research & Management), Dr K Sekhar, OS & CC R&D (Missile Systems & Low Intensity Conflicts), Dr. R Sreehari Rao, OS & CC R&D (Electronics & Computer Sciences),
Dr. KD Nayak, OS & CC R&D (Micro Electronics and Devices & Management Information System and Technologies), Dr. SC Pandey, Addl. FA (P) & JS, Ministry of Defence (Finance), Shri KVR Murty, Integrated Financial Advisor, DRDO and other senior officers of the organisation.

The delivery of G.P.F. Accounts Statements to almost 20,000 subscribers of the DRDO located at such far-flung places as Leh in North, Tejpur in East, Ahmednagar in West and Kochi in south marks a significant improvement over the position in past years when these Accounts were given to the subscribers in July and August 2010. This initiative is yet another step in the efforts being made by the PCDA (R&D) towards achieving greater customer satisfaction in respect of services being rendered by it to the DRDO. Achieving this involved detailed planning, business process re-engineering, switching over to a contemporary data base system and close co-ordination with DRDO Labs in different parts of the country. Shri Kaushal assured the Scientific Advisor that every member of his organization is committed to bringing about more and more improvement in delivery of its services to the DRDO.

In his address, Dr. Saraswat lauded the work being performed by the organization of the PCDA and value it is adding to the efforts of the DRDO. He appreciated the early delivery of GPF account statement, a great initiative showing the professional approach.

DRDO

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Finally Gripen Too To Join The Club, Sweden Offers Jets For Libya!


Sweden is prepared to deploy up to eight fighter jets to help patrol the UN-authorised no-fly zone over Libya, Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt said Tuesday.

After a cabinet session where a bill was approved, Reinfeldt told parliament it was time to move from "words to action".

Sweden received a request to participate earlier Tuesday.

The Swedish JAS Gripen jets were however not to be used to target forces on the ground, the premier said after consulting with the main opposition parties.

In addition to at most eight fighter jets, Sweden was prepared to deploy a Hercules tanker plane and a reconnaissance plane.

IANS

India, Pakistan Agree To Disagree, Yet Again!!

Joint Statement following India-Pakistan Home/Interior Secretary level talks

March 29, 2011

1. The India-Pakistan Home/Interior Secretary level Talks were held in New Delhi on March 28-29, 2011. The Indian delegation was led by Shri Gopal K. Pillai, Home Secretary of India, while the Pakistan delegation was headed by Mr. Qamar Zaman Chaudhary, Interior Secretary of Pakistan.

2. The meeting was held in pursuance of the decision taken in Thimphu (Bhutan) in February 2011 by the Governments of Pakistan and India, to resume the dialogue process and in the backdrop of Bilateral meeting between the Home Minister of India and the Interior Minister of Pakistan held in Islamabad on June 25-26, 2010.

3. The meeting was held in a cordial and friendly atmosphere.

4. Both sides exchanged views on the decisions taken in the last round of Talks held in Islamabad in 2008. It was agreed that it was important for both sides to remain engaged on outstanding issues and henceforth the Home/Interior Secretary level Talks would be held bi-annually.

5. Both sides agreed to set up a Hotline between Home Secretary of India and Interior Secretary of Pakistan to facilitate real time information sharing with respect to terrorist threats.

6. Both sides reiterated their commitment to fight terrorism in all its forms and manifestations and reaffirmed the need to bring those responsible for such crimes to justice.

7. Pakistani side provided updates on the ongoing trial and investigation in Pakistan on the Mumbai Terror Attacks. Pakistan conveyed its readiness, in principle, based upon the principle of comity and reciprocity, to entertain a Commission from India with respect to Mumbai Terror Attack investigations. Modalities and composition in this connection will be worked out through diplomatic channels. Dates for the visit of the Judicial Commission from Pakistan in connection with Mumbai attack trial will be conveyed by India within four-six weeks. NIA and FIA will continue to cooperate in the Mumbai Terror Attack investigations.

8. India provided information on the on-going Samjhautha Express blast case investigation. It was also agreed that after filing of report in the court, updated information will be shared with the concerned Pakistan authorities.

9. Both sides noted and welcomed the release of prisoners and fishermen by each other since the last round of Talks. It was agreed that both sides would release by April 15, 2011 those civilian prisoners/fishermen who have completed their sentence, whose nationality status has been confirmed by the respective Governments and whose travel documents have been received. Complete list of prisoners in each others’ custody will be exchanged by both sides on July 1, 2011.

10. Both sides agreed that the problem and issues of the inadvertent crossers should be viewed sympathetically, and in a focused and sensitive manner. Accordingly, both sides also agreed to task the Coast Guard of India and Pakistan Maritime Security Agency to work on setting up a mechanism for release of inadvertent crossers (fishermen) and their boats on the same lines as the inadvertent crossers on land. The Group will submit its report to the Home/Interior Secretaries before the next round of Talks.

11. Both sides commended the work done by the Judicial Committee on Prisoners for the release, repatriation and humane treatment of prisoners and agreed on the need for its continuation. The next meeting of the Judicial Committee would be held from April 19-23, 2011 in Pakistan.

12. Both sides shared the concern of the growing menace of Narcotics/Drugs and agreed that cooperation between NCB of India and ANF of Pakistan should be enhanced to ensure an effective control on drug trafficking. It was further agreed that Talks between DG, NCB and DG ANF would be held annually. Indian side accepted the invitation for DG NCB to visit Pakistan in May 2011 for talks with DG ANF.

13. The ‘MoU on Drug Demand Reduction and Prevention of Illicit Trafficking in Narcotics Drugs/Psychotropic Substances and Precursor Chemicals and related matters’ as finalized will be formally signed at the next DG level meeting of NCB-ANF in May 2011.

14. It was decided that CBI and FIA will schedule a meeting to work out the technical details of moving forward on issues of, human trafficking, counterfeit currency, cyber crimes and Red Corner Notices (RCNs).

15. Both sides agreed to set up a Joint Working Group to examine the modalities for streamlining the visa procedure/modalities and for giving a final shape to revision of the Bilateral Visa Agreement.

16. The Interior Secretary of Pakistan invited the Home Secretary of India for the next Home/Interior Secretary level Talks in Pakistan. The invitation was accepted.

17. Both sides agreed that the visit of the Interior Minister of Pakistan to India will take place on mutually convenient dates, to be decided through diplomatic channels.

MEA

Monday, March 28, 2011

Coast Guard Ships C-150, C-151 Commissioned





Indian Coast Guard Ships C-150 and C-151 were commissioned by Vice Admiral Anil Chopra, Director General Coast Guard at an impressive ceremony in Kochi today.


The two ships are the 8th and 9th of the 11 Interceptor Boat (IB) class, designed and built indigenously by M/s ABG Shipyard, Surat. They are fitted with ultra modern navigational and communication equipment, and will be deployed for enhancing the close coast surveillance capability of Indian Coast Guard.

The 28 metre ships displace 90 tons each, and have an endurance of 500 nautical miles with an economical speed of 25 knots. They can achieve a maximum speed of 45 knots for responding to urgent calls at sea, and are equipped with advanced navigational and communication equipment. In addition to small arms, the IBs are fitted with 12.7 mm ‘Prahari’ Heavy Machine Gun (HMG).

C-150 and C-151 are commanded by Commandant Ashok Kumar and Commandant RK Sinha, and will be based at Vizhinjam and Kakinada respectively. The commissioning ceremony was attended by Inspector General SPS Basra, Commander Coast Guard Region (West), senior officers from the Navy and Central and State Governments.

DPR

Sunday, March 27, 2011

Indian Navy's 4th Successful Anti-piracy Operation in 2011 !!





On 26th Mar 11, the Indian Navy achieved yet another success against pirates when INS Suvarna intercepted pirate mother ship Morteza in the Arabian Sea. 16 pirates were apprehended and 16 crew members rescued in the operation.

On 23rd Mar 11 and 26th Mar 11 pirate attacks were reported on MSC Eva and MV Kensington respectively around 300-400 nm West of Lakshadweep Islands in the Arabian Sea. On receiving reports of the failed attacks, Indian Naval ships and aircraft already on anti-piracy deployment in the Lakshadweep islands were diverted to the area. The IN surveillance aircraft located Morteza with skiffs in tow and INS Suvarna arrived at the scene soon thereafter. INS Suvarna made repeated attempts to communicate with the mother ship Morteza in vain. Thereafter INS Suvarna warned the mother Morteza to stop, Morteza did not stop and instead tried to escape and fired at INS Suvarna. INS Suvarna returned limited fire.

Personnel onboard Morteza were observed abandoning the ship and INS Suvarna rescued a total of 32 personnel. CGS Sangram, deployed for anti-piracy operations, was also involved in the operation. Prima facie indications are that 16 personnel are crew members and 16 are pirates. The rescued personnel are all being taken to Mumbai where they will be handed over to the police for further investigation.

It may be recalled that Indian Navy has recently taken action against three pirate mother ships viz on 28 Jan, 05 Feb and 12 Mar. A total of 104 pirates had been apprehended in these incidents. The present apprehension of 16 more pirates indicates the firm and resolute actions taken by the Indian Navy and the Indian Coast Guard and demonstrates the nation's determination to strengthen safety of merchant shipping in the international sea lanes in the Arabian Sea. Proactive action being taken by the Indian Navy has also been lauded by the International Maritime Bureau recently.

DPR-Indian Navy

Former Prez Kalam Gives Away DRDO Awards






“Find the unique YOU” urged Dr APJ Abdul Kalam, the former President of India while addressing a gathering of DRDO’s top leaders, DRDO awardees and members of “mahila kalyan manch”. He was speaking as the Chief Guest, during the DRDO awards ceremony held on 26th March 2011, in Bhagavantam Auditorium at Metcalfe House, Delhi. These DRDO awards are given each year on the occasion of DRDO Directors’ Conference. The “Young scientist awards” are given to DRDS scientists for dedicated outstanding work in their specialized areas. Similarly, the “Best Performance awards” are given to DRTC personnel and personnel from Administrative, stores and allied cadres, for extraordinary efforts and contribution in respective technical, administrative/stores and other related work. “I am delighted to participate in this 35th DRDO Director’s Conference and give away the awards. I am very happy to see young people getting awards”, stated Dr. Kalam.

Stressing on the importance of focusing attention on the technologies for meeting future defence needs – 2030 and beyond, he emphasized that significant share of DRDO’s efforts and resources need to be spent on such technologies.

In his address earlier, Dr. Vijay Kumar Saraswat, Scientific Advisor to Raksha Mantri, Secretary Deptt of Defence R&D and DGR&D, described Dr. Abdul Kalam as ”true inspiration and role model for the DRDO’s young scientists and technologists for his vision of developed India” and “father of missile program of India”. Presenting some recent accomplishments of DRDO, he highlighted the Initial operational clearance for Light Combat Aircraft Tejas and role out of prototype of its Naval version, Maiden flight test of Medium Altitude Long Endurance Unmanned Aerial Vehicle-RUSTOM, Successful launches of AGNI, Prithvi and Dhanush
missiles by the users, successful Interceptor Missile Test, successful launch of BrahMos missile.

He also mentioned about the induction of Under Barrel Grenade Launcher, Multi-mode grenade, Carrier Command Post Tracked Vehicle, and delivery of multi barrel rocket launcher system –Pinaka, MBT Arjun tanks, NBC Recce vehicle, Armoured Engineering Reece vehicles. He also mentioned about the new initiatives in the areas of technologies and systems. Dr. Saraswat gave credit of the accomplishments to the committed bright DRDO scientists and personnel. “I am sure that this will propel the DRDO scientists and personnel further to excel in their respective fields, whether it is scientific research or technical areas or administration” he stated.

Earlier, Dr. J Narayana Das OS and CCR&D (Naval Systems and HR) gave the welcome address. Dr. Arun Kumar, OS and Director of Personnel gave the vote of thanks. Others present during the ceremony included CCR&Ds, Directors of DRDO laboratories and establishments, and other dignitaries.

The DRDO Directors’ Conference is held once in a year, during which top leadership of DRDO led by the SA to RM, deliberate on various defence technologies. The theme for this year’s conference (25-27 March 2011) is “Emerging War Scenarios and Strategies”. The conference was inaugurated by Shri A K Antony, the Honorable Raksha Mantri on 25th March 2011 at DRDO Bhawan, New Delhi.

DRDO
















Saturday, March 26, 2011

Details Of What The 16 Rafales Are Doing In Libya


Sixteen Rafales (8 Rafale C and B from the Air Force and 8 Rafale M from Navy) Rafale F3 (third version, fully polyvalent, which includes capability to carry Reco NG pod, nuclear missile ASMPA and Exocet antiship missile) have been engaged in operations in Libya. In their air-patrol version (CAP), they are equipped with 6 Mica air-to-air missiles (4 radar and 2 infrared) and 3 supersonic fuel tanks (1250 liters).

In their close air support (CAS) version, they are equipped with 4 AASM guided bombs, 4 Mica and 2 external fuel tanks (2000 liters). Most of Libyan targets have been destroyed by AASM bombs fired from Rafales in CAS version. First Rafales were illuminated by Libyan alert radars but Rafale’s Spectra protection modules made any Libyan AA attempt useless. Some of the Rafales are equipped with Reco NG targeting pod, which allow them to fly at high altitude and deliver ordonances in a safe position. In this configuration, they are also used to do reconnaissance and intelligence missions.

The pod has an Hama captor which can take images at high altitude and a IRLS infrared scanner suited for low altitude and high speed reco. This targeting pod was previously used by French Navy’s Rafales in Afghanistan.

CAG Calls Golf Unauthorised In The Army!!


DNA

Friday, March 25, 2011

Manage Human Resources Effectively : Antony To DRDO





The Defence Minister Shri AK Antony has called upon the DRDO top brass to nurture talent and ensure “fairness at all levels” in order to realise the organisation’s goals.

“I would like to flag one issue for the top brass of DRDO – paying undivided attention to and effective management of human resources,” Shri Antony said, addressing the 35th Directors’ Conference of the DRDO here today.

“No amount of technology and financial resources can ever match the vibrancy of human resource. Effective HR policies are the key to a dynamic, vibrant and futuristic organization. I call upon CCR&Ds, Directors and senior scientists in charge of laboratories to lead by example and maintain transparency and fairness at all levels, even in routine administrative matters. DRDO personnel at all levels must be given equal opportunities in matters pertaining to career progression and training,” he added.

Shri Antony called upon the DRDO top brass to create a “dynamic work environment.”

“We want to retain and attract the vast pool of talent, but the Government’s efforts must be backed up by genuine support so that its intentions are translated into reality at the ground level. The onus clearly lies on the top hierarchy of DRDO to create and sustain a creative, positive, vibrant and dynamic work environment, where the other levels of personnel feel motivated to give off their best and at the same time, their reasonable expectations are fully met,” he said.

Shri Antony said though the DRDO has developed “spin-off” products that have greatly benefitted the civil society, it must not lose sight of its prime objectives.

“Without discouraging such efforts, I would like to add in the same vein that such spin-off benefits must not be allowed to cloud the vision of DRDO. It must strongly focus its energy and resources on developing weapon systems and adequate high-end critical defence technologies for our Armed Forces,” he said.

Lauding the DRDO’s indigenous missile development programme, Shri Antony said that the country needs missiles that can reach 5,000 kms and a reliable missile defence system.

“India has been able to reach an appreciable level of competence in missile technologies, with a reach capability up to 3,500 kilometers. Now, DRDO is developing Agni missile, with a capacity to reach 5,000 kilometers. DRDO must also speed up the developmental trials and induction of Interceptor Missile for a credible Ballistic Missile Defence,” he said.

Shri Antony cautioned against delays in vital weapons projects that affected the operational preparedness of the Armed Forces.

“Time and cost overruns continue to be a matter of concern. While whole-heartedly appreciating DRDO, I have to give the other side of picture too. I am conveying the concerns of our Armed Forces. Such delays not only invite criticism, but also have an adverse impact the operational preparedness of our Armed Forces,” he said.

The Defence Minister stressed on the need for partnership between DRDO and the Armed Forces.

“It is the collective duty of the Defence Industry, Armed Forces and the scientific fraternity to hold regular and healthy interactions among themselves to understand each other’s concerns and requirements in a better way… As the technology hub for our Armed Forces and the nation, DRDO needs to enhance the frequency of its interaction with all the concerned S&T departments, as well as the end user – our Armed Forces. Air Chief used a phrase – ‘Partner’, it is a correct term. But they (Armed Forces) are partners, as well as ‘Users’,” Shri Antony said.

Pointing out that the unconventional warfare and low-intensity conflicts have emerged as the new threats, the Defence Minister said that the requirements of the soldier deployed in counter-insurgency operations and jungle warfare, including his mental health, must be met.

“I have recently asked one of the life science laboratories of DRDO to undertake extensive psychological research to optimize the stress profile and enhance the mental health of soldiers. The objective of this exercise is to further reduce the incidents of suicides and fratricides among soldiers. The earlier steps have resulted in a substantial reduction of such incidents and resulted in control and management of such aberrations in mental behaviour. Fratricides are more or less, under control,” Shri Antony said.

Addressing the gathering Shri Satpalji Maharaj, Chairman, Standing Committee of Parliament on Defence, strongly advocated that the DRDO’s budget should be raised to 15 percent of the Defence Budget, at par with some of the neighbouring countries. He also supported the DRDO staff’s demand to implement the sort of incentives that have been advanced to similar organisations like the ISRO.

In his address Dr. Vijay Kumar Saraswat, Scientific Advisor to Raksha Mantri, said that after the Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) Tejas, the DRDO will take up the design of Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft (AMCA) in the financial year 2011-12. The Chief of Air Staff and Chairman, Chiefs of Staff Committee, Air Chief Marshal PV Naik, Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Nirmal Verma and the Defence Secretary Shri Pradeep Kumar also spoke on the occasion.

DPR

Indian Coast Guard Station In Ratnagiri To Become Operational From Tomorrow

The Indian Coast Guard Station (ICGS) at Ratnagiri in Maharashtra will become operational from tomorrow. Vice Admiral Anil Chopra, Director General Coast Guard, will commission the ICGS Ratnagiri in the presence of Inspector General SPS Basra, Commander Coast Guard Region (West).

ICGS Ratnagiri will function under the administrative and operational control of the Commander, Coast Guard Region (West) through the Commander, Coast Guard District HQ-2 (Maharashtra) located at Mumbai. Commandant BH Kumbhare has been appointed as the first Commanding Officer of the Station.

The new CG station at Ratnagiri will play an effective role in undertaking joint coastal patrol along with State Police, Customs and Fisheries Department to thwart maritime security threats. One more station at Dahanu has been planned for establishment in the state of Maharashtra in the current year. In addition, setting up of a Coast Guard Air Station at Ratnagiri is also on the anvil. This will be the first full-fledged air station of the Coast Guard in the state of Maharashtra, and will play a crucial role in maritime surveillance and Search & Rescue and adjoining coast of Maharashtra.

In response to the enhanced role that has been assigned to the Coast Guard in the past two years, the service is pursuing urgent enhancement of its surveillance capabilities, so as to meet its tasks and responsibilities effectively. The present force-levels and manpower are slated to be doubled in a few years by graduated procurement, with proportionate and corresponding infrastructure development and augmentation of trained manpower.

DPR

Standing Committee On Armed Forces' Preparedness


DNA

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Airbus Military A400M Completes Low-speed Take-off Tests




The Airbus Military A400M has completed a challenging series of tests to determine the lowest speed at which it can take-off – known as minimum unstick speed or Vmu. During the tests, performed at Istres in France, the aircraft’s nose was raised until a special ‘bumper’ fitted to the rear fuselage struck the ground at the maximum pitch-up angle of 13º. In the close-up photo sparks can be seen flying from the bumper as it drags on the runway.

Singapore And Indian Navy Conduct Simbex-2011

The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) and the Indian Navy (IN) are conducting the annual Singapore Indian Maritime Bilateral Exercise (SIMBEX) from 18 to 25 Mar 2011. Hosted by Singapore, this year's exercise is the 18th in the series of bilateral exercise held since 1994. The exercise comprises a shore phase, already held at the Changi Naval Base and a sea phase currently being carried out in the South China Sea.

SIMBEX 2011 which sees the RSN and IN conducting advanced naval warfare training involving air, surface and sub-surface dimensions, aims to enhance the interoperability and mutual understanding between the two navies. The RSN is participating in SIMBEX 2011 with three frigates, a missile corvette, a submarine and a maritime patrol aircraft, while the Republic of Singapore Air Force is deploying fighter aircraft for the exercise. Joining them are three destroyers, a corvette, a fleet tanker as well as a maritime patrol aircraft from the Indian Navy.

SIMBEX started in 1994 as a training-oriented anti-submarine warfare exercise and has since grown in scale and complexity over the years. The exercise underscores the long-standing defence ties between the RSN and IN. The two navies also interact regularly through a range of activities, including professional exchange programmes, staff talks and courses.

DPR-Navy

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Sri Lankan Prez, PM At International Buddhist Conference


His Excellency Mahinda Rajapaksa, President of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka, visited the Sri Lanka International Buddhist Academy (SIBA) this morning to inaugurate the International Buddhist Conference organized by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR). The Ministry of External Affairs and the Ministry of Buddhasasna and Religious Affairs of Sri Lanka, together with the Sri Lanka International Buddhist Academy and the University of Peredeniya were the Partner Institutes for the Conference, which is being organized as part of the joint commemoration by India and Sri Lanka of the 2600th anniversary of the attainment of enlightenment by Lord Buddha.

The inauguration of the Conference was also graced by the presence of Hon’ble D.M. Jayaratne, Prime Minister, Prof. G. L. Peiris, Hon’ble Minister of External Affairs, Mr. Ashok K. Kantha, High Commissioner of India and Mr. Suresh K. Goel, Director General, Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR). The Governor of the Central Province, a number of senior Cabinet Ministers, the Attorney General of Sri Lanka, Deputy Ministers, Members of Parliament, Provincial Ministers, Members of the Central Provincial Council and senior officials of the Government of Sri Lanka also attended the inauguration ceremony.
ICCR

Southern Command GoC-in-C Review's Security Of Southern States


Lieutenant General A K Singh, AVSM, SM, VSM, GOC-in-C Southern Command visited Chennai on 23 March 2011. This is his first visit to Chennai after taking over the Command of prestigious Southern Army. He inspected the station and reviewed the operational preparedness of HQ Andhra, Tamilnadu, Karnataka & Kerala Area.



DPR

EA-18G Demonstrates Its EW Capability First Time In Combat, As MMRCA Countdown Begins!!



DNA

Sunday, March 20, 2011

Next To Fly Over Libya:RAF Typhoons From Italian AF Bases !!


From South Italy a detachment of the Royal airforce Typhoons is expected to take off to Libya soon, as part of the UN commitment to ensure a no-fly-zone. They would operate from Italian airforce bases, as they did during the Yugoslavia conflict!

Friday, March 18, 2011

UNSC Approves No Fly Zone Over Libya

Security Council Approves ‘No-Fly Zone’ over Libya, Authorizing ‘All Necessary Measures’ to Protect Civilians, by Vote of 10 in Favour with 5 Abstentions

Demanding an immediate ceasefire in Libya, including an end to the current attacks against civilians, which it said might constitute “crimes against humanity”, the Security Council this evening imposed a ban on all flights in the country’s airspace — a no-fly zone — and tightened sanctions on the Qadhafi regime and its supporters.

Adopting resolution 1973 (2011) by a vote of 10 in favour to none against, with 5 abstentions (Brazil, China, Germany, India, Russian Federation), the Council authorized Member States, acting nationally or through regional organizations or arrangements, to take all necessary measures to protect civilians under threat of attack in the country, including Benghazi, while excluding a foreign occupation force of any form on any part of Libyan territory — requesting them to immediately inform the Secretary-General of such measures.

Recognizing the important role of the League of Arab States in the maintenance of international peace and security in the region, and bearing in mind the United Nations Charter’s Chapter VIII, the Council asked the League’s member States to cooperate with other Member States in implementing the no-fly zone.

The Council stressed the need to intensify efforts to find a solution to the crisis that responded to the legitimate demands of the Libyan people, noting actions being taken on the diplomatic front in that regard. It further demanded that Libyan authorities comply with their obligations under international law and take all measures to protect civilians and meet their basic needs and to ensure the rapid and unimpeded passage of humanitarian assistance.

In that connection, the Council specified that the flight ban would not apply to flights that had as their sole purpose humanitarian aid, the evacuation of foreign nationals, enforcing the ban or other purposes “deemed necessary for the benefit of the Libyan people”.

It further decided that all States should deny permission to any Libyan commercial aircraft to land in or take off from their territory unless a particular flight had been approved in advance by the committee that was established to monitor sanctions imposed by resolution 1970 (2011).

In tightening the asset freeze and arms embargo established by that resolution, the Council this evening further detailed conditions for inspections of transport suspected to be violating the embargo, requesting States enforcing the embargo to coordinate closely with each other and the Secretary-General on the measures they were taking towards implementation.

It requested the Secretary-Secretary to create an eight-member panel of experts to assist the Security Council committee in monitoring the sanctions.

Introducing the resolution, the Foreign Minister of France, Alain Juppé, said “the situation on the ground is more alarming than ever, marked by the violent re-conquest of cities that have been released”. The Security Council could not stand by and “let the warmongers flout international legality”. The world was experiencing “a wave of great revolutions that would change the course of history”, but the will of the Libyan people had been “trampled under the feet of the Qadhafi regime”. Earlier Council measures had been ignored and violence against Libyan civilians had redoubled.

He said that the urgent need to protect the civilian population had led to the elaboration of the current resolution, which authorized the Arab League and those Member States wishing to do so to take all measures to protect areas that were being threatened by the Qadhafi regime. “We have very little time left — perhaps only a matter of hours,” he said, adding that each hour and day that passed “increased the weight” on the international community’s shoulders.

Speaking after the vote, representatives who had supported the text agreed that the strong action was made necessary because the Qadhafi regime had not heeded the first actions of the Council and was on the verge of even greater violence against civilians as it closed in on areas previously dominated by opposition in the east of the country. They stressed that the objective was solely to protect civilians from further harm.

Lebanon’s speaker stressed that the text would not result in the occupation of “one inch” of Libyan territory by foreign forces. The representative of the United Kingdom pledged that partners in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the Arab League were now ready to act to support the text.

The representative of the United States said that today, the Council had responded to the Libyan peoples’ cry for help. The Council’s purpose was clear: to protect Libyan civilians. The Security Council had authorized the use of force, including enforcement of a no-fly zone, to protect civilians and civilian areas targeted by Colonel Muammar Al-Qadhafi, his allied forces and mercenaries.

The representatives of China and the Russian Federation, explaining their abstentions, prioritized peaceful means of resolving the conflict and said that many questions had not been answered in regard to provisions of the resolution, including, as the Russian representative put it, how and by whom the measures would be enforced and what the limits of the engagement would be. He said the resolution included a sorely needed ceasefire, which he had called for earlier. China had not blocked the action with a negative vote in consideration of the wishes of the Arab League and the African Union, its representative said.

The delegations of India, Germany and Brazil, having also abstained, equally stressed the need for peaceful resolution of the conflict and warned against unintended consequences of armed intervention.

Statements were also made made by the representatives of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Colombia, Portugal, Nigeria and South Africa.

The meeting was opened at 6:25 p.m. and closed at 7:20 p.m.

Action on Draft

Speaking before the vote, ALAIN JUPPÉ, Minister for Foreign Affairs of France, said the world was experiencing “a wave of great revolutions that would change the course of history”, as people throughout North Africa and the Middle East were calling for “a breath of fresh air”, for freedom of expression and democracy. Such calls for democratic transition had echoed through Tunisia, Egypt and Morocco. Everyone had witnessed the events with great hope and he believed “this new Arab springtime is good news for all”. The changes required the international community not to “give lessons”, but to help the people of those countries build a new future.

Yet, he said, while such transitions in other countries had not been met with extreme violence, the will of the Libyan people had been “trampled under the feet of the Qadhafi regime”, as Colonel Muammar Al-Qadhafi mercilessly attacked his own people. In light of those actions, the international community had responded swiftly; the General Assembly had suspended the country from the Human Rights Council, determining that the systematic and widespread attacks could constitute crimes against humanity. In addition, the Security Council’s earlier resolution had called for an immediate end to the violence and had referred the situation in Libya to the International Criminal Court.

Unfortunately, those measures had not been enough and violence against Libyan civilians had been redoubled, he said. Again, the international community had acted with unanimity, particularly through the League of Arab States’ call on the Security Council to enact a no-fly zone and the African Union’s strong call for an end to the violence. “Yet, the situation on the ground is more alarming than ever, marked by the violent re-conquest of cities that have been released,” he said, stressing that the Security Council could not stand by and “let the warmongers flout international legality”.

In light of that, France had been working assiduously with the United Kingdom, the United States and other members of the international community calling for means to protect the civilian population. Those efforts had led to the elaboration of the current resolution, which authorized the Arab League and those Member States wishing to do so to take all measures to protect areas that were being threatened by the Qadhafi regime. “We have very little time left — perhaps only a matter of hours,” he said, adding that each hour and day that passed “increased the weight” on the international community’s shoulders. The Security Council had acted to ensure that democracy prevailed.

The Council then adopted resolution 1973 (2011) by a vote of 10 in favour to none against, with 5 abstentions (Brazil, China, Germany, India, Russian Federation).

NAWAF SALAM (Lebanon) said that Libya was suffering heavily, with hundreds of victims dying and thousands displaced. Faced with those risks and the great danger of those crimes, the United Nations had acted earlier, but Colonel Qadhafi had not heeded those actions. Lebanon, agreeing with the League of Arab States, had then called on the Security Council to establish measures to protect civilians. The Libyan authorities had lost all their legitimacy and the resolution was aimed at protecting Libyan civilians.

He stressed that the resolution would not have as a consequence occupation of “even an inch” of Libyan territory. He hoped that the resolution would have a deterrent role and end the Libyan authorities’ use of force. He reaffirmed full support for the county’s sovereignty, the need for full cooperation between the United Nations and the League of Arab States, pursuant to Chapter VIII of the United Nations Charter, and the necessity of a peaceful solution to the situation. The resolution was fraught with hope for Libya and its people, he concluded.

MARK LYALL GRANT (United Kingdom), agreeing that the Libyan regime had lost legitimacy, had violated the Council’s resolutions and was on the verge of assaulting Benghazi, said he had pressed for the early adoption of the current resolution. He pledged that partners in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the Arab League were now ready to act to support the text. The resolution put the United Nations clearly behind the highest values of the Organization.

PETER WITTIG (Germany) said the Security Council’s intention was to stop the violence in Libya and send a message to Colonel Qadhafi and his associates “that their time is over [and] they must relinquish power immediately”. While the Council acted on Libya, North Africa was undergoing major political changes, meriting the international community’s full support. The aim should be to promote political transition in Libya, stop the violence and begin a true political process. “The people of Libya who have so clearly expressed their aspirations for democracy should be supported,” he said, adding that the Interim National Council was an important interlocutor in that regard.

He said his country was particularly concerned by the plight of the Libyan people and believed it was crucial to tighten existing sanctions to “cut [the Libyan regime] off” from the funds that had propped it up for so long. Decisions regarding the use of military force were always extremely difficult to take. Indeed, in the implementation of the resolution just adopted, Germany saw great risks, and the likelihood of large-scale loss of life should not be underestimated. Those that participated in its implementation could be drawn into a protracted military conflict that could draw in the wider region. If the resolution failed, it would be wrong to assume that any military intervention would be quickly and efficiently carried out. Germany had decided not to support the resolution and would not contribute its own forces to any military effort that arose from its implementation. Germany had abstained from the vote.

SUSAN RICE (United States) said that today, the Council had responded to the Libyan peoples’ cry for help. The Council’s purpose was clear: to protect Libyan civilians. The Council had adopted an earlier resolution that had sent a strong message, but Colonel Qadhafi and those that still stood by him had continued to grossly and systematically violate the most fundamental rights of the Libyan people. The Arab League had subsequently called on the Council to take more stringent measures, and the current resolution was an answer to that call, as well as a strong response to the situation in the ground.

She said the Security Council had authorized the use of force, including enforcement of a no-fly zone, to protect civilians and civilian areas targeted by Colonel Qadhafi, his allied forces and mercenaries. The text also tightened measures already approved under resolution 1970 (2011). In addition, it established a panel of experts to monitor short- and long-term implementation of the sanctions. She stressed that the future of Libya should be decided by the Libyan people. The United States stood with the people of Libya in their struggle to exercise their fundamental rights.

HARDEEP SINGH PURI (India), explaining his abstention, expressed great concern over the welfare of the population of Libya and supported the appointment of the Secretary-General’s Envoy. The report of that Envoy and that of others had not yet been received. As a consequence, today’s resolution was based on very little clear information, including a lack of certainty regarding who was going to enforce the measures. There must be certainty that negative outcomes were not likely before such wide-ranging measures were adopted. Political efforts must be the priority in resolving the situation.

MARIA LUIZA RIBERIO VIOTTI (Brazil) said her delegation was deeply concerned about the situation in Libya and regretted that the “strong message” sent by resolution 1970 (2011) had note yet been heeded. The Brazilian Government had earlier condemned the violence being carried out by Libyan authorities and had called on them to uphold and protect the right of free expression of the protesters and to seek a solution to the crisis through meaningful dialogue. Her delegation’s vote today should in no way be interpreted as condoning the behaviour of the Libyan authorities or as disregard for the need to protect civilians and respect for their rights.

She said that while Brazil stood in solidarity with all movements in the region expressing their legitimate demands for better governance, and had taken into account the Arab League’s call for strong measures to stop the violence through a no-fly zone, it believed that the resolution contemplated measures that went beyond that call. “We are not convinced that the use of force as provided for in operative paragraph 4 of the present resolution will lead to the realization of our common objective — the immediate end of violence and the protection of civilians,” she said, adding that Brazil was also concerned that the measures approved today might have the unintended effect of exacerbating the current tensions on the ground and “causing more harm than good to the very same civilians we are committed to protecting”. No military action alone would succeed in ending the conflict. Protecting civilians, ensuring lasting settlement and addressing the legitimate demands of Libyan citizens demanded a political process.

IVAN BARBALIĆ (Bosnia and Herzegovina) reiterated his delegation’s grave concern about the rapidly deteriorating situation in Libya. The Libyan people desperately needed humanitarian assistance, and the unimpeded access of that relief was an absolute necessity. He called on Libyan authorities to end their violence against the Libyan people and he believed the resolution was an answer to their legitimate call and to the call of regional organizations.

NÉSTOR OSORIO (Colombia) said his delegation was convinced that the purpose of the new resolution was essentially humanitarian and was conducive to bringing about conditions that would lead to the protection of civilians under attack from a regime that had lost all legitimacy. The Council had acted because the Government, through its actions, had shown that it was not up to protecting and promoting the rights of its people.

Colombia deplored the fact that the measures under resolution 1970 (2011) had not been heeded. It was also concerned that the current text had not been adopted unanimously. Colombia believed that the best way to ratchet up the pressure on the Qadhafi regime was to impose a no-fly zone, as called for by the League of Arab States. The grave situation on the ground made it clear that all conditions were present for the Council to enact further measures and tighten the sanctions approved under resolution 1970 (2011).

VITALY CHURKIN (Russian Federation) said he had abstained, although his country’s position opposing violence against civilians in Libya was clear. Work on the resolution was not in keeping with Security Council practice, with many questions having remained unanswered, including how it would be enforced and by whom, and what the limits of engagement would be. His country had not prevented the adoption of the resolution, but he was convinced that an immediate ceasefire was the best way to stop the loss of life. His country, in fact, had pressed earlier for a resolution calling for such a ceasefire, which could have saved many additional lives. Cautioning against unpredicted consequences, he stressed that there was a need to avoid further destabilization in the region.

JOSÉ FILIPE MORAES CABRAL (Portugal) said his country had voted in favour of the text because the attacks against civilians had continued after the passage of the last Council resolution, and conditions were deteriorating. He affirmed that today’s resolution addressed his country’s priorities, including protecting civilians, facilitation of unimpeded humanitarian aid, promotion of a national dialogue and guarantees for the territorial integrity and independence of Libya. He supported all diplomatic efforts to resolve the situation.

U. JOY OGWU (Nigeria) said the resolution had been necessitated by the persistently grave and dire situation in Libya. “The current State of affairs leaves an indelible imprint on the conscience and compels us to act,” she said, adding that her delegation’s persistent calls for peace were rooted in the need to ensure the protection of civilians and the delivery of humanitarian assistance to those most in need, many of whom were Nigerian nationals. The League of Arab States and the African Union had spoken with one voice in condemnation of the situation in Libya.

She said that while her delegation had supported the current text, it also believed that foreign occupation was not an option to ensure peace. Nigeria supported language in the current text that negated that possibility. Nigeria was also encouraged by the fact that the political path to a solution was endorsed in the text. “Today, we have sent an unequivocal message to the Libyan people that the dignity and safety of every man woman and child is paramount,” she said, adding that when the fate of innocent civilians was in question, the international community, undaunted, must be ready to respond.

BASO SANGQU (South Africa) said his delegation was deeply concerned by what was fast becoming a civil war in Libya. He hoped it could be resolved in a peaceful manner, according to the will of the Libyan people. Any solution must also preserve the solidarity and integrity of Libya and, as such, South Africa supported the dispatch by the African Union of a special mission to the country. He encouraged that mission to work closely with the Secretary-General’s newly appointed Special Envoy on finding a peaceful solution.

He said that South Africa regretted that the Council’s previous resolution had not been heeded and believed that by adopting the current text, the Council had acted responsibly to answer the call of Libyan people. It would also speed humanitarian assistance to those that needed it most. He hoped the letter and spirit of the present resolution would be implemented in full.

Security Council President LI BAODONG (China), speaking in his national capacity, said that the continuing deterioration of the situation in Libya was of great concern to China. However, the United Nations Charter must be respected and the current crisis must be ended through peaceful means. China was always against the use of force when those means were not exhausted. His delegation had asked specific questions that failed to be answered and, therefore, it had serious difficulty with the resolution. It had not blocked the passage of the resolution, however, because it attached great importance to the requests of the Arab League and the African Union. At the same time, he supported the efforts of the Secretary-General’s Envoy to resolve the situation by peaceful means.

Resolution

The full text of resolution 1973 (2011) reads as follows:

“The Security Council,

“Recalling its resolution 1970 (2011) of 26 February 2011,

“Deploring the failure of the Libyan authorities to comply with resolution 1970 (2011),

“Expressing grave concern at the deteriorating situation, the escalation of violence, and the heavy civilian casualties,

“Reiterating the responsibility of the Libyan authorities to protect the Libyan population and reaffirming that parties to armed conflicts bear the primary responsibility to take all feasible steps to ensure the protection of civilians,

“Condemning the gross and systematic violation of human rights, including arbitrary detentions, enforced disappearances, torture and summary executions,

“Further condemning acts of violence and intimidation committed by the Libyan authorities against journalists, media professionals and associated personnel and urging these authorities to comply with their obligations under international humanitarian law as outlined in resolution 1738 (2006),

“Considering that the widespread and systematic attacks currently taking place in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya against the civilian population may amount to crimes against humanity,

“Recalling paragraph 26 of resolution 1970 (2011) in which the Council expressed its readiness to consider taking additional appropriate measures, as necessary, to facilitate and support the return of humanitarian agencies and make available humanitarian and related assistance in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya,

“Expressing its determination to ensure the protection of civilians and civilian populated areas and the rapid and unimpeded passage of humanitarian assistance and the safety of humanitarian personnel,

“Recalling the condemnation by the League of Arab States, the African Union and the Secretary-General of the Organization of the Islamic Conference of the serious violations of human rights and international humanitarian law that have been and are being committed in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya,

“Taking note of the final communiqué of the Organization of the Islamic Conference of 8 March 2011, and the communiqué of the Peace and Security Council of the African Union of 10 March 2011 which established an ad hoc High-Level Committee on Libya,

“Taking note also of the decision of the Council of the League of Arab States of 12 March 2011 to call for the imposition of a no-fly zone on Libyan military aviation, and to establish safe areas in places exposed to shelling as a precautionary measure that allows the protection of the Libyan people and foreign nationals residing in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya,

“Taking note further of the Secretary-General’s call on 16 March 2011 for an immediate ceasefire,

“Recalling its decision to refer the situation in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya since 15 February 2011 to the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, and stressing that those responsible for or complicit in attacks targeting the civilian population, including aerial and naval attacks, must be held to account,

“Reiterating its concern at the plight of refugees and foreign workers forced to flee the violence in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, welcoming the response of neighbouring States, in particular Tunisia and Egypt, to address the needs of those refugees and foreign workers, and calling on the international community to support those efforts,

“Deploring the continuing use of mercenaries by the Libyan authorities,

“Considering that the establishment of a ban on all flights in the airspace of the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya constitutes an important element for the protection of civilians as well as the safety of the delivery of humanitarian assistance and a decisive step for the cessation of hostilities in Libya,

“Expressing concern also for the safety of foreign nationals and their rights in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya,

“Welcoming the appointment by the Secretary General of his Special Envoy to Libya, Mr. Abdul Ilah Mohamed Al-Khatib and supporting his efforts to find a sustainable and peaceful solution to the crisis in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya,

“Reaffirming its strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity and national unity of the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya,

“Determining that the situation in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya continues to constitute a threat to international peace and security,

“Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

“1. Demands the immediate establishment of a ceasefire and a complete end to violence and all attacks against, and abuses of, civilians;

“2. Stresses the need to intensify efforts to find a solution to the crisis which responds to the legitimate demands of the Libyan people and notes the decisions of the Secretary-General to send his Special Envoy to Libya and of the Peace and Security Council of the African Union to send its ad hoc High-Level Committee to Libya with the aim of facilitating dialogue to lead to the political reforms necessary to find a peaceful and sustainable solution;

“3. Demands that the Libyan authorities comply with their obligations under international law, including international humanitarian law, human rights and refugee law and take all measures to protect civilians and meet their basic needs, and to ensure the rapid and unimpeded passage of humanitarian assistance;

“Protection of civilians

“4. Authorizes Member States that have notified the Secretary-General, acting nationally or through regional organizations or arrangements, and acting in cooperation with the Secretary-General, to take all necessary measures, notwithstanding paragraph 9 of resolution 1970 (2011), to protect civilians and civilian populated areas under threat of attack in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, including Benghazi, while excluding a foreign occupation force of any form on any part of Libyan territory, and requests the Member States concerned to inform the Secretary-General immediately of the measures they take pursuant to the authorization conferred by this paragraph which shall be immediately reported to the Security Council;

“5. Recognizes the important role of the League of Arab States in matters relating to the maintenance of international peace and security in the region, and bearing in mind Chapter VIII of the Charter of the United Nations, requests the Member States of the League of Arab States to cooperate with other Member States in the implementation of paragraph 4;

“No-fly zone

“6. Decides to establish a ban on all flights in the airspace of the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya in order to help protect civilians;

“7. Decides further that the ban imposed by paragraph 6 shall not apply to flights whose sole purpose is humanitarian, such as delivering or facilitating the delivery of assistance, including medical supplies, food, humanitarian workers and related assistance, or evacuating foreign nationals from the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, nor shall it apply to flights authorised by paragraphs 4 or 8, nor other flights which are deemed necessary by States acting under the authorization conferred in paragraph 8 to be for the benefit of the Libyan people, and that these flights shall be coordinated with any mechanism established under paragraph 8;

“8. Authorizes Member States that have notified the Secretary-General and the Secretary-General of the League of Arab States, acting nationally or through regional organizations or arrangements, to take all necessary measures to enforce compliance with the ban on flights imposed by paragraph 6 above, as necessary, and requests the States concerned in cooperation with the League of Arab States to coordinate closely with the Secretary General on the measures they are taking to implement this ban, including by establishing an appropriate mechanism for implementing the provisions of paragraphs 6 and 7 above,

“9. Calls upon all Member States, acting nationally or through regional organizations or arrangements, to provide assistance, including any necessary overflight approvals, for the purposes of implementing paragraphs 4, 6, 7 and 8 above;

“10. Requests the Member States concerned to coordinate closely with each other and the Secretary-General on the measures they are taking to implement paragraphs 4, 6, 7 and 8 above, including practical measures for the monitoring and approval of authorised humanitarian or evacuation flights;

“11. Decides that the Member States concerned shall inform the Secretary-General and the Secretary-General of the League of Arab States immediately of measures taken in exercise of the authority conferred by paragraph 8 above, including to supply a concept of operations;

“12. Requests the Secretary-General to inform the Council immediately of any actions taken by the Member States concerned in exercise of the authority conferred by paragraph 8 above and to report to the Council within 7 days and every month thereafter on the implementation of this resolution, including information on any violations of the flight ban imposed by paragraph 6 above;

“Enforcement of the arms embargo

“13. Decides that paragraph 11 of resolution 1970 (2011) shall be replaced by the following paragraph : “Calls upon all Member States, in particular States of the region, acting nationally or through regional organisations or arrangements, in order to ensure strict implementation of the arms embargo established by paragraphs 9 and 10 of resolution 1970 (2011), to inspect in their territory, including seaports and airports, and on the high seas, vessels and aircraft bound to or from the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, if the State concerned has information that provides reasonable grounds to believe that the cargo contains items the supply, sale, transfer or export of which is prohibited by paragraphs 9 or 10 of resolution 1970 (2011) as modified by this resolution, including the provision of armed mercenary personnel, calls upon all flag States of such vessels and aircraft to cooperate with such inspections and authorises Member States to use all measures commensurate to the specific circumstances to carry out such inspections”;

“14. Requests Member States which are taking action under paragraph 13 above on the high seas to coordinate closely with each other and the Secretary-General and further requests the States concerned to inform the Secretary-General and the Committee established pursuant to paragraph 24 of resolution 1970 (2011) (“the Committee”) immediately of measures taken in the exercise of the authority conferred by paragraph 13 above;

“15. Requires any Member State whether acting nationally or through regional organisations or arrangements, when it undertakes an inspection pursuant to paragraph 13 above, to submit promptly an initial written report to the Committee containing, in particular, explanation of the grounds for the inspection, the results of such inspection, and whether or not cooperation was provided, and, if prohibited items for transfer are found, further requires such Member States to submit to the Committee, at a later stage, a subsequent written report containing relevant details on the inspection, seizure, and disposal, and relevant details of the transfer, including a description of the items, their origin and intended destination, if this information is not in the initial report;

“16. Deplores the continuing flows of mercenaries into the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya and calls upon all Member States to comply strictly with their obligations under paragraph 9 of resolution 1970 (2011) to prevent the provision of armed mercenary personnel to the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya;

“Ban on flights

“17. Decides that all States shall deny permission to any aircraft registered in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya or owned or operated by Libyan nationals or companies to take off from, land in or overfly their territory unless the particular flight has been approved in advance by the Committee, or in the case of an emergency landing;

“18. Decides that all States shall deny permission to any aircraft to take off from, land in or overfly their territory, if they have information that provides reasonable grounds to believe that the aircraft contains items the supply, sale, transfer, or export of which is prohibited by paragraphs 9 and 10 of resolution 1970 (2011) as modified by this resolution, including the provision of armed mercenary personnel, except in the case of an emergency landing;

“Asset freeze

“19. Decides that the asset freeze imposed by paragraph 17, 19, 20 and 21 of resolution 1970 (2011) shall apply to all funds, other financial assets and economic resources which are on their territories, which are owned or controlled, directly or indirectly, by the Libyan authorities, as designated by the Committee, or by individuals or entities acting on their behalf or at their direction, or by entities owned or controlled by them, as designated by the Committee, and decides further that all States shall ensure that any funds, financial assets or economic resources are prevented from being made available by their nationals or by any individuals or entities within their territories, to or for the benefit of the Libyan authorities, as designated by the Committee, or individuals or entities acting on their behalf or at their direction, or entities owned or controlled by them, as designated by the Committee, and directs the Committee to designate such Libyan authorities, individuals or entities within 30 days of the date of the adoption of this resolution and as appropriate thereafter;

“20. Affirms its determination to ensure that assets frozen pursuant to paragraph 17 of resolution 1970 (2011) shall, at a later stage, as soon as possible be made available to and for the benefit of the people of the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya;

“21. Decides that all States shall require their nationals, persons subject to their jurisdiction and firms incorporated in their territory or subject to their jurisdiction to exercise vigilance when doing business with entities incorporated in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya or subject to its jurisdiction, and any individuals or entities acting on their behalf or at their direction, and entities owned or controlled by them, if the States have information that provides reasonable grounds to believe that such business could contribute to violence and use of force against civilians;

“Designations

“22. Decides that the individuals listed in Annex I shall be subject to the travel restrictions imposed in paragraphs 15 and 16 of resolution 1970 (2011), and decides further that the individuals and entities listed in Annex II shall be subject to the asset freeze imposed in paragraphs 17, 19, 20 and 21 of resolution 1970 (2011);

“23. Decides that the measures specified in paragraphs 15, 16, 17, 19, 20 and 21 of resolution 1970 (2011) shall apply also to individuals and entities determined by the Council or the Committee to have violated the provisions of resolution 1970 (2011), particularly paragraphs 9 and 10 thereof, or to have assisted others in doing so;

“Panel of Experts

“24. Requests the Secretary-General to create for an initial period of one year, in consultation with the Committee, a group of up to eight experts (“Panel of Experts”), under the direction of the Committee to carry out the following tasks:

(a) Assist the Committee in carrying out its mandate as specified in paragraph 24 of resolution 1970 (2011) and this resolution;

(b) Gather, examine and analyse information from States, relevant United Nations bodies, regional organisations and other interested parties regarding the implementation of the measures decided in resolution 1970 (2011) and this resolution, in particular incidents of non-compliance;

(c) Make recommendations on actions the Council, or the Committee or State, may consider to improve implementation of the relevant measures;

(d) Provide to the Council an interim report on its work no later than 90 days after the Panel’s appointment, and a final report to the Council no later than 30 days prior to the termination of its mandate with its findings and recommendations;

“25. Urges all States, relevant United Nations bodies and other interested parties, to cooperate fully with the Committee and the Panel of Experts, in particular by supplying any information at their disposal on the implementation of the measures decided in resolution 1970 (2011) and this resolution, in particular incidents of non-compliance;

“26. Decides that the mandate of the Committee as set out in paragraph 24 of resolution 1970 (2011) shall also apply to the measures decided in this resolution;

“27. Decides that all States, including the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, shall take the necessary measures to ensure that no claim shall lie at the instance of the Libyan authorities, or of any person or body in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, or of any person claiming through or for the benefit of any such person or body, in connection with any contract or other transaction where its performance was affected by reason of the measures taken by the Security Council in resolution 1970 (2011), this resolution and related resolutions;

“28. Reaffirms its intention to keep the actions of the Libyan authorities under continuous review and underlines its readiness to review at any time the measures imposed by this resolution and resolution 1970 (2011), including by strengthening, suspending or lifting those measures, as appropriate, based on compliance by the Libyan authorities with this resolution and resolution 1970 (2011);

“29. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.”













UN Dept of Pub Info, New York.

Photos : Prime Minister's Territorial Army Day Parade






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Photos : MoS-Defence Meets Korean Parliamentary Delegation



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Thursday, March 17, 2011

MoD Annual Report 2010-11 : Anti-Piracy Under UN Flag, African Development, ASEAN, J&K, Myanmar

Calling the spread of piracy close to India's western seaboard a cause of great concern, in its Annual Report for 2010-11 tabled in Parliament today, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) has proposed a proactive role under the United Nations flag to tackle the threat to maritime traffic from piracy.

According to the report, IOR being “central” to India’s maritime interests and concerns,the threat of piracy and terrorism to international trade and safety of the sea lanes of communication has emerged as a major problem. The report takes note of the recent political developments in West Asia and North Africa. “The impact of these developments on the security situation in the region and on the security of energy supplies is of global concern," says the report.

The report takes note of the recent political developments in West Asia and North Africa. “The impact of these developments on the security situation in the region and on the security of energy supplies is of global concern.”

The report says that the ASEAN Defence Ministers Meeting Plus forum of ten ASEAN and eight non-ASEAN countries, including India, is an effort to establish an open and inclusive security architecture for the region.

On the situation in Jammu and Kashmir, the report implicates Pakistan “due to undiminished activities of terrorist organizations from its territory.”

“The continued infiltrations across the LoC and the existence of terrorist camps across the India-Pak border demonstrate the continuing ambivalence of Pakistan in its attitude and approach to terrorist organisations, even though such organizations pose a danger to Pakistan’s own social and political fabric.”

On Myanmar, the report says India continues to engage with its eastern neighbor and cooperation in security matters is being enhanced. “The Government of Myanmar has reciprocated India’s gestures of goodwill and friendship”. On Sri Lanka the report says India supports Colombo’s efforts to find a lasting political settlement. “India stands ready to enhance bilateral cooperation in a range of areas, including defence and security”.

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First Indian-Origin Woman US Naval Officer Comes To Chennai As CO Of US Warship.


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